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Viking-Store™

Loki, Wood, Norse pantheon, viking pagan asatru heathen god and goddess Scandinavian gods altar mythology wood sculpture odin statue

  • $180.00 USD
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  • Tracked Delivery FREE
  • Handmade
  • Materials: oak, oak wood

  • Height: 9 inches
  • Width: 3.75 inches
  • Depth: 1.75 inches
  • undefined undefined Handmade wooden statuette of Loki carved out of oak wood.


    Dimensions: 9 inches (23 cmc tall).
    Material: Oak.
    Handmade.

    DEAR BUYERS, PLEASE NOTE:

    1. Each statue is unique, and will be slightly different from the one presented on the photo.

    2. This statue will be carved and shipped by the order in 14-20 days.


    Loki is the wily trickster god of Norse mythology.

    While treated as a nominal member of the gods, Loki occupies a highly ambivalent and ultimately unique position among the gods, giants, and the other kinds of spiritual beings that populate the pre-Christian Norse religion.

    His familial relations attest to this. His father is the giant Farbauti (Old Norse Fárbauti, “Cruel Striker”). His mother is Laufey (the meaning of which is unknown) or Nal (Nál, “Needle”). Laufey/Nal could be a goddess, a giantess, or something else entirely – the surviving sources are silent on this point. Loki is the father, by the giantess Angrboda (Angrboða, “Anguish-Boding”), of Hel, the goddess of the underworld; Jormungand, the great serpent who slays Thor during Ragnarok; and Fenrir, the wolf who bites off one of the hands of Tyr and who kills Odin during Ragnarok – hardly a reputable brood, to say the least. As we’ll see below, Loki demonstrates a complete lack of concern for the well-being of his fellow gods, a trait which could be discerned, in vague outline, merely by considering these offspring of his.

    With his proper wife Sigyn (“Friend of Victory”), he also has a son named Nari or Narfi, whose name might mean “Corpse.”

    Loki often runs afoul not only of societal expectations, but also of what we might call “the laws of nature.” In addition to the progeny listed above, Loki is also the mother – yes, the mother – of Sleipnir, Odin’s shamanic horse, whom Loki gave birth to after shapeshifting into a mare and courting the stallion Svadilfari, as is recounted in the tale of The Fortification of Asgard.

    In the tales, Loki is portrayed as a scheming coward who cares only for shallow pleasures and self-preservation. He’s by turns playful, malicious, and helpful, but he’s always irreverent and nihilistic.

    Loki, Wood, Norse pantheon, viking pagan asatru heathen god and goddess Scandinavian gods altar mythology wood sculpture odin statue